JIM AND HIS BUTTERFLY COLLECTION, PART TWO

Jim is home from work. Now he can resume with his butterflies, his day-flying insects of the order Lepidoptera, his collection of adults, eggs, larvae, pupae.

He loves looking at their brightly-colored wings, imagining their conspicuous, skipping, fluttering flight, their polymorphism, their mimicry, their aposematism, their long-distance migrations, their symbiotic evolution and parasitic relationships with social insects such as ants, their importance, economically, as agents of pollination, and even, yes, as pests, because in their larval stages they can damage domestic crops or trees.